Independence: What NASFAT Missioner Asked Nigerians To Do
NASFAT Missioner, Onike Abdul-Azeez (Photo Courtesy: The Carter Center)

The Chief Missioner, NasruLlah-il Fathi Society (NASFAT), Imam Abdul-Azeez Onike, has urged parents and guardians to teach their children to imbibe the culture of integrity to make them useful to Nigeria.

Concise News reports that Onike spoke on Wednesday at a Youths Summit with the theme: “Discovering and Harnessing the Potential of 21st Century Muslim Teens” at Alausa, Ikeja.

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He said the summit was part of the efforts by NASFAT to ensure that teenagers, who were critical in the Nigerian project, were assisted to harness their individual talents toward the nation’s building.

According to him, “it is heartwarming that our teenagers are being given the opportunity to voice out how they can be understood with a view to making their talents and resources useful to Nigeria.

“Islam encourages elders to hear out children; NASFAT will continue to create platform for our teenagers who are driven to becoming ‘entertainment generations’.

“We will collaborate with any organisation who share the same vision of having productive teenagers in Nigeria,” he said.

Onike, who noted that teenagers should be guided rightly and regularly, said they should also be allowed to enjoy their youthful life and live their teenage live without contravening the Holy Qur’an and Sunnah.

“Recent findings on why Finland educational system is growing faster than the U.S shows that children are allowed to have time to let out their extra steams positively with no home-work or school assignment approach,” he added.

Also, Ruqoyah Ogunbiyi, a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Professional, urged parents to understand the psyche of the current set of teenagers usually referred to as “the Millenials”, and dialogue with them.

Ogunbiyi further advised parents to try and engage their children regularly to understand teenagers’ mentality, vocabularies and languages and educate them on the islamic point of view.

“How many of the parents present know what is called “Twerk (To dance to a music in a sexually provocative manner) or have had cause to ask what the position of Islam is on it,” she queried.

In her remarks, Mrs Rahmat Adisa, Education Secretary of NASFAT, said that teenagers needed to be heard at all times and guided appropriately.