NCAA Provides Update On Air Peace Safety After Emergency Landings
An Air Peace flight skidded off Port Harcourt International Airport runway in late June (Image courtesy Channels TV)

The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) says that all operational aircraft on the fleet of Air Peace Limited are airworthy, despite recent emergency landings.

Concise News learned that the NCAA General Manager in charge of Public Affairs, Sam Adurogboye, made this known on Sunday.

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An Air Peace flight, with more than 90 people on board, had on 22 June skidded off Port Harcourt International Airport runway.

According to the Federal Airport Authority of Nigeria (FAAN), the incident occurred during a downpour.

Similarly, another Air Peace plane crash-landed at the local wing of the Murtala Muhammad International Airport, Lagos, on 23 July.

The airline made the emergency landing on the runway, but no life was lost.

It was gathered that the airline had developed a technical fault after takeoff from Port Harcourt, Rivers State.

But Adurogboye said that the NCAA found the airline’s aircraft airworthy after it had carried out a thorough technical audit of its fleet.

He said that the regulatory agency had also ensured that the airline was in compliance with extant Nigeria Civil Aviation Regulations.

“On July 23, at about 10.28 a.m. , an Air Peace B737-300 aircraft with Registration Marks 5N- BQO had an incident on landing at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos,” a statement from Adurogboye read.

“The Accident Investigation Bureau (AIB) is currently carrying out an indepth investigation into the incident to determine the immediate and remote causes responsible for this particular incident.

“This investigation is required by International Standards stipulated in the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Annex 13, while NCAA awaits the conclusion and report of the AIB.”

Adurogboye assured the public that all aircraft on the fleet of the NCAA’s authorised Air Operators Certificate (AOC) holders operating in Nigeria were airworthy.